Homes Fit for the Future

Article by Tom Bragg

We all deserve a good home and Cambridge’s acute need for affordable housing has been well covered in this paper.  ‘Good’ homes are also energy-efficient, comfortable and affordable to heat. Well insulated, draught-free homes cost little more to build, later recovered through lower fuel bills.

A ‘draught-free’ home doesn’t means living in an air-tight box. Many new homes have ventilation with heat recovery, where the in-coming air is warmed by the out-going air in winter. The rooms have comfortable, fresh-air, which is transforming for people with asthma, as most allergens are filtered out. 

Cambridge has the highest density in the UK of really good quality ‘Code 5 for Sustainable Homes’, like those in Eddington and Virido in Great Kneighton.  But disastrously the government scrapped this whole building Code, along with ‘Zero Carbon Homes’. I fear much new building will be to minimum standards. And even the claimed standards aren’t met in many homes, as revealed by people trained and lent thermal imaging cameras by Cambridge Carbon Footprint through the winter.

I think the City Council’s ‘Cambridge Sustainable Housing Design Guide’ is an excellent description of sustainable new-build. It applies to housing on council owned land and new Greater Cambridge Housing Development Agency social housing in Cambridge. But although this guide has been ‘adopted’ by South Cambs and the County, it doesn’t seem to apply to their new homes!  Why not?  It’s vital to raise minimum standards for other builders too, which has to come from government.

Developers often oppose higher energy-efficiency standards, saying that not so many new homes would be built. But since 2015 Scotland has enforced considerably higher standards than the rest of the UK and their proportion of new-builds has not fallen as a result.

Let’s meet local housing need by all available means, while ensuring our new homes are fit for the future. We’re preparing for ‘Open Eco Homes’ in September, when householders will show visitors round their sustainable homes (including retro-fitted old ones), demonstrating a wide variety of practical solutions.   We find people are hungry for the right energy-saving measures in their homes.

A version of this blog post first appeared in the Cambridge Independent

Posted in News | Leave a comment

Keeping Cool in Heatwave

Article by Tom Bragg

With climate change we have to expect more extreme weather and this year we’ve already had a very wet spring followed by the heatwave and drought.

Here’s a few of ways to stay comfortable in a heatwave:

  • Cool yourself with a water spray, damp towel or cold pack. Have regular cold drinks.
  • Shade your home on the sunny side with external blinds or awnings - drawing curtains or blinds helps too. 
  • Shut windows, vents and doors to keep out hot air, opening them to cool your home at night.
  • Avoid unwanted heating from appliances, lighting or hot pipes.
  • Insulation that helps keep your home warm in winter will also help it stay cool in summer. 
  • There’s more detailed advice on these points at CambridgeCarbonFootprint.org

Older people and young children are most at risk from over-heating, especially if their home is hot.  If you know people like this, and your home is fairly cool, can you be neighbourly and invite them to cool off or maybe offer practical help?

But some brand new homes still get uncomfortably hot:

Last year, one of our volunteers, who was trained and lent a thermal imaging camera, helped a friend with a lovely new sunny flat in Trumpington Meadows understand why her flat was unbearably hot. The over-heating was mainly caused by having large windows on the sunny side, without any external shading, and by not having any through-ventilation. Imaging revealed that it was made worse by many poorly insulated hot pipes that ran through the flat.  Our volunteer advised using blinds to keep the sun out and provided the thermal images to help get the developer to insulate the pipes properly. Sadly this remains an all too common example of a new home built without the design details keep it comfortable in heatwaves.  

The UK independent Committee on Climate Change says new homes must be designed and built to be prepared for a changing climate, and that this needs to be put into building regulations, along with effective enforcement of the standards.

See our free event on ‘Getting Your Home Ready for Climate Change’ at St Barnabas Church, Mill Rd, CB1 2BD on 15th October, openecohomes.org/events

A version of this blog post first appeared in the Cambridge Independent on the 18th July 2018

Posted in News | Leave a comment

Wood-burning – Inconvenient Truth

There’s ever-growing  evidence that wood-burning is a big contributor to air pollution, especially in cities.

On January 22nd London had a major air pollution incident, with Camden, Westminster and The City hitting 10 out of 10 (worst) on the Air Quality Index.  “We think about half of the peak was from wood smoke” said Timothy Baker, air pollution expert at King’s College London.  Wood smoke pollution is most on cold evenings and weekends – this was a cold, still Sunday.  Small smoke particles have the worst health effects, especially PM2.5 (smaller than 2.5 micro-meter), which get deep into your lungs.    During that incident Cambridge levels of PM2.5 were  9/10 on the index. Domestic wood smoke contributes about a third of all UK PM2.5, which is  2.4 times more than traffic

UK government’s best estimate is that 29,000 extra deaths a year are caused by PM2.5   Public Health England estimates that 5% of mortality of people aged 30+  in Cambridgeshire is due to PM2.5 pollution. So this really is a major health problem, with wood smoke a significant contributor. Continue reading

Posted in Home energy, News | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Thermal Imaging Guide

You can reveal where buildings are wasting heat with vivid thermal images… this guide shows how with lots of practical examples.

I’ve been testing the £200 Flir One smartphone add-on. It’s as good as CCF’s £1,800 thermal imaging cameras with smartphone advantages, although not so rugged.  Many more community groups and individuals can now afford to use thermal imaging to show poor insulation, draughts and other ways our homes loose heat.

Drawing on CCF’s experience of thermal imaging since 2009, this guide aims to help many others get started and to supplement our training sessions.

Posted in Home energy, News | Leave a comment

DETRITUS TRANSFIGURED – essay by Philip Vann

view of parade costume by Ann Templar cropped

DETRITUS TRANSFIGURED: The Cambridge CirculART Trail – essay by Philip Vann

Over three days in June 2016 I set out on quite an adventure – exploring on foot fifteen of the charity shops on the CirculART Trail in near-central Cambridge. Here, displayed in both shop windows and retail interiors for one month, was a dynamically diverse array of artworks made by over two dozen local artists. All had been sourced out of everyday scraps and bits of detritus; also from once perhaps individually treasured yet now abandoned oddments. Continue reading

Posted in News | Leave a comment

Hempcrete workshop at Thoday Street

Today’s blog is another cross post from the Open Eco Homes blog. If this post gets you enthused about hempcrete make sure you check out the hempcrete workshop being offered at Thoday Street. At the time of writing there are two half price tickets up for grabs! 

Alex Jelly installing wood-fibre insulation 2This years Open Eco Homes features Thoday Street, a house where the emphasis is firmly on natural building materials. Alex Jelly (pictured here with her Cob pizza oven and installing wood fibre insulation) and partner Mike are determined to make their eco-renovation affordable and natural, and want to help others do the same. As Alex points out in her case study “indoor air pollution is generally far higher than outdoors (a fact that shocked me when I first found out)”.

Turning to natural materials reduces the potential for ‘off-gassing’ from more common synthetic insulation materials, and also allows for complete return to the natural environment once the material is no longer required. Affordability prevents many people taking on an eco-renovation but learning a DIY solution like Hempcrete can make a real difference to price, and bring it within the reach of more people. Continue reading

Posted in News | Leave a comment

Does your Combie fire up at odd times?

Today’s blog is a cross post from the Open Eco Homes blog. Written by Anne Miller, a former Eco Homes host this blog post is a great example of the sort of detailed advice you get on an Open Eco Homes tour. Bookings are now open for tours on September 18th and 24th.

Eltisley Av 150x150About a month ago, after we’d had a few plumbing jobs done, we noticed that our Combie boiler was turning itself on every time we used a cold tap. Or more precisely, the boiler turned itself on briefly, a few seconds after we turned a cold tap off.

This seemed very odd! The whole point of a Combie is that it only heats up the hot water when you need it. It was also very annoying, because we try hard to keep our energy usage and carbon emissions to a minimum, and this was clearly wasting energy. We subsequently estimated that it had increased our summer gas usage by about 10%. Continue reading

Posted in News | Leave a comment

Brexit and our Environment

Please ask your MP to support the Environment Pledge.

The Brexit negotiations pose many threats and opportunities for UK environmental protection and our urgent transition into a low-carbon nation.

If red-tape slashing vested interests get the upper hand, vital protections for our wild life, countryside  and seas will be swept aside. Also support for changing our industries, energy supplies, homes and lifestyles into the low-carbon future we need to avoid dangerous climate change.

There are opportunities to improve on EU regulations with better ones appropriate to the UK. For example the Common Agricultural Policy could be replaced with support for landowners and farmers, especially smaller ones, with the right incentives to take good care of the wildlife and land they know so well, as well as growing the food we love.  A majority of British public support environmental protection at least as strong as current EU rules. Continue reading

Posted in Blog, News | Leave a comment

Vacancy: Open Eco Homes

dream job

Open Eco Homes Project Worker?

Open Eco Homes (OEH) arranges for householders to show and explain to visitors on 2 weekends in September how they save home energy by their home’s design, retro-fitted improvements, smart behaviour, etc. Continue reading

Posted in News | Leave a comment

CCF Paris Workshop

Workshop (640x360)

We’d offered to run a CCF workshop about personal footprints: “How to stop feeling helpless” at Climat Forum at a fairly bleak school in the Paris suburb of Montreuil. We only had confirmation a week ago. Publicity was minimal. Would anyone come?  Continue reading

Posted in News | Leave a comment

UK Innovators in Paris

Outside Climate Solutions (640x360)

Extra security in Paris is undersandable but there were 2 events we couldn’t get into.

On Friday night we went to the launch of Energy Unlocked, a new UK organisation supporting low-carbon energy innovation. It’s a small startup, which attracted low-carbon business organisations over a remarkable range of scale:    Continue reading

Posted in News | Leave a comment

Hosting Open Eco Homes

CCF_DSC3612 16f cropped 5x4

Anne shows off her DIY demountable window awnings

Anne Miller
(Home F, in Open Eco Homes 2015)

When Tom suggested last year that we should be an Open Eco Home, I was a little nervous: Did we have enough to show people? Would they criticise my standards of housework? Looking back, those fears seem rather irrational, but they were real at the time, and I suspect quite common amongst other Open Eco Home hosts.

We’ve steadily been improving our home (an Edwardian terrace) since 2001, and this has had a substantial impact on our energy use. Our gas consumption is a quarter of what it was Continue reading

Posted in News | Leave a comment

Warm Homes Mill Road VIDEOS

Videos of householders in the Mill Road area and home energy improvements they have made:

Patricia’s Victorian “2-up, 2-down”
now with internal insulation, double-glazed sash windows, woodstove & solar PV:
[youtube HyluD1d1tCU]

Judith Green’s eco-renovation of her Victorian terraced house, with carefully chosen high-tech, re-used and sustainable materials:
[youtube daYPkKyos0o]

For details of materials Judith used, see her “Ross Street” case Study at Open Eco Homes

Posted in News | Comments Off on Warm Homes Mill Road VIDEOS

October newsletter: A tasty sustainable feast!

CCF

We’re very excited that tickets are now available for the launch of our Food for a Greener Future Campaign at Fitzbillies restaurant. We’ll be celebrating the best of local, sustainable, delicious food with a menu specially designed by Fitbillies first-class chef, Rosie Sykes. Booking is available through the event page on the CCF website.

As part of the Food for a Greener Future Campaign we’re also challenging you all to eat local in November! The goal? To source all of your food from within a 30-mile radius of Cambridge for three weeks. How hard can it be? Click here for lots more info on the challenge.

And if the thought of tasty sustainable food excites you, do check out our sustainable food blog if you haven’t seen it recently. There are some great posts from our regular contributors (even when we don’t have a challenge going on) – and also some delicious recipes!

Last chance! – Now is your last chance to book for our Carbon Conversations group starting next Wednesday! It’s a wonderful opportunity to find out more about low carbon living and to really kick start your low carbon life. We have a few spots left, so email alana@cambridgecarbonfootprint.org to book now.

Contents

  1. Carbon Conversations: Kick start your low carbon life!
  2. Festival of Ideas, 28 October
  3. Warm Homes Mill Road, 2 November
  4. Celebration of Sustainable Food at Fitzbillies, 21 November
  5. Eat local this November!
  6. It’s the Science
  7. Gardening in October – Something in the garden is staying warm!
  8. Public Meeting: The gagging law
  9. Global Sustainability Institute Seminar: A Fevered Planet
  10. Introduction to Permaculture with Claire White
  11. Global Sustainability Institute: Festival of Ideas event
  12. Green Enterprise: Carlos Ludlow-Palafox on opportunities in recycling

1. Carbon Conversations: Kick start your low carbon life!

Carbon Conversations is starting next week! It’s a great opportunity to connect with others and learn together about how we can live lower carbon lives. There are 6 sessions in all and each session is a supportive space to:

  • Learn about the impact of our food, travel, consumption and energy use
  • Share ideas and create plans
  • Talk and meet new people
  • Begin to get a grip on climate change

Meetings will be held fortnighly on from 7.30pm October 9th.

To register for this course, or your interest in attending any future Carbon Conversations groups please email your full name to alana@cambridgecarbonfootprint.org, or phone the CCF office on 01223 301842.

2. Festival of Ideas, 28 October

28 October 2013, 7.00-9.00pm, St Lukes Church, Victoria Road Cambridge, CB4 3DZ 

We all want to do something about climate change in light of the idea that it poses a real threat to humanity. But what can we personally do? This workshop for the Cambridge University Festival of Ideas looks at our current levels of consumption, energy use, global travel and food sourcing and asks, ‘Are the solutions within our reach?’

Participants will have the chance to compare their lifestyle expectations with lifestyle expectations as recently as 40 years ago and consider what it would be like to redraw the boundaries we have set to create a more sustainable lifestyle for ourselves. A lifestyle that would be fulfilling, enjoyable and exciting while at the same time lower in carbon.

The workshop will provide participants with a taste of the Carbon Conversations course we also run, which is a series of six engaging meetings helping participants to halve their carbon footprint.

For bookings email info@cambridgecarbonfootprint.org or call the CCF office on 01223 301842.

3. Warm Homes Mill Road, 2 November

 2 November, Mill Road Area & Ross Street Community Centre, CB1 3UZ

After the popularity of our Warm Homes Trumpington event, CCF have put together a whole day home-energy event for the Mill Road area, including a morning of visits to local houses with energy-saving improvements, as well as an afternoon at Ross St Community Centre with:

  • talks and workshops by home energy experts
  • videos of local homes and homeowners talking to energy experts
  • stalls with reliable local suppliers and installers
  • expert advice about you can do to save energy in your home including tailored advice for tenants
  • DIY improvements
  • Getting the best out of your house at no extra cost
  • latest information on loans and grants, including the Green Deal

Check out the full timetable of activities at the Ross St Centre (pdf)

The main focus will be on the many pre-1920s houses in the area (and throughout Cambridge) which have solid walls and are therefore more difficult and expensive to insulate.

Please contact us for more information, bookings for home tours will be open soon.

4. Celebration of Sustainable Food at Fitzbillies, 21 November

21 November, 7.00pm, Fitzbillies Restaurant 52A Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1RG

Join us at Fitzbillies to celebrate the delicious and varied sustainable, local food around Cambridge, and to launch the new Food for a Green Future campaign. There will be three course sustainable set menu, including both vegan and omnivorous options. Tickets are £33 per person not including drinks.

Booking only through Cambridge Carbon Footprint. Click here for more info and to book your spot!

5. Eat local this November!

4 November – 17 November

Roll up your sleeves, switch your brain into ‘inventive cooking’ mode, and get ready to go crazy in the kitchen! After a break over the summer, we’re once again once again gearing up for our next food challenge. Your goal? To source all of your food from within a 30-mile radius of Cambridge for three weeks, with an extra emphasis on reducing your meat and dairy intake.

It should also be mentioned that we do advocate the ‘five exceptions’ rule: that is, please allow yourself five ingredients (such as rice, tea, quinoa, spices etc) that are not local…just to ensure you are getting the proper nutrition and still enjoy your food!

Participants will also have the opportunity to write about their experiences on our sustainable food blog, and to meet other participants at a bring-and-share meal.

There’s lots more information on the CCF website, but to take part in the challange and join up with other local eaters you just need to email elaina@cambridgecarbonfootprint.org.

6. It’s the Science

By Tom Bragg

Yesterday I was at DECC’s launch of the new IPCC climate science report, which provides a consensus view with unequivocal messages; most climate scientists actually think the situation is even more challenging, but it was uplifting to be with so many people who wanted to explain and act on the science.

For the first time, it describes a global carbon budget: to have a two-thirds chance of staying below a dangerous 2°C of global warming, humankind must add less than one trillion tonnes of carbon to the atmosphere. By 2011 we’d already used half this budget, and unless emissions are cut rapidly, we’ll burn the rest in 30 years. The report also warns that this budget may be smaller, because of ‘known unknowns’ in the climate system, like methane emissions from permafrost.

Heeding this climate science implies that at least two-thirds of current fossil fuel reserves must be left in the ground – a complete reversal of the rush to discover and burn more oil, gas and coal.

But with a General Election looming, politicians are falling over themselves to freeze fuel prices or fuel duty. Please oppose these and other short-term populist measures that feed climate change.

The hard truth is that fossil fuel prices will need to rise even further. We must strive to ease the effect of this on those who can’t afford it: a small example is CCF’s new Warm Homes Plus project to provide households in fuel poverty with advice and practical help to improve their homes’ thermal efficiency.

7. Gardening in October – Something in the garden is staying warm!

By Keith Jordan

As October day lengths shorten and the sun is lower in the sky, temperatures are generally on the decline. This is a natural trigger for many animals and plants to make provision for storage and survival during the winter months. Jays and squirrels will be collecting acorns to bury, insects may be laying eggs, pupating or finding safe hibernation places. Many herbaceous plants die back, shed leaves or divert their energy reserves from leaves and stems to their roots, tubers or bulbs.

Associated with mass decomposition of plant material, well-made compost heaps will be warming up.
Decomposition involves millions of microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) plus some larger organisms including earthworms, molluscs and woodlice. Under optimal aerobic conditions, composting proceeds through three phases:

1) Mesophilic phase (moderate-temperature), which lasts for a few days (look out for woodlice and worms). Composting will occur optimally if the mixture of materials is right – a good mix of greens (the wet, soft, green materials, high in nitrogen) and browns (the dry harder, absorbent materials high in carbon). It needs to be moist (water if necessary, but not too wet) and have enough air (some bulky, twiggy material provides this). Covering with old carpet will help to keep the heat in.

2) Thermophilic phase (high-temperature), lasting from a few days to several weeks depending on the time of year and material. Billions of bacteria (good species!) and fungi will chemically break down the variety of organic materials, using a broad range of enzymes, and generating heat in the process. You may have seen evidence of this exothermic process – steam rising from a heap of manure on a cold day. This is the basis of the old technique of hot beds used in the walled kitchen gardens of stately homes to raise plants in cold frames out of their normal season.

Larger, insulated compost heaps may heat up to 40-50°C and municipal scale compost systems to 60-70°C destroying pathogens, fly larvae, and weed seeds. It would be interesting to use a thermal camera to check yours! Mix grass clippings, straw or hay to kick start slow, cool compost heaps. Natural products high in ammonia can also help (e.g. poultry manure, waste water from an aquarium, etc.).
Lack of oxygen (if too wet or compacted/ perhaps too much soil added) results in anaerobic bacteria producing ammonia and hydrogen sulphide (smelly and no heat!).

3) Cooling and maturation phase, lasting several-months. Woodlice and worms carry on the process.
Turning material once or twice will help this stage. The result is nutrient rich organic matter, perfect material for adding to your soil, making potting compost and mulching around plants.

8. Public Meeting: The gagging law

Last month Tom Bragg wrote a piece in our newsletter about the upcoming gagging law. Many charities (including CCF) are concerned about the implications to their activities. To voice these concerns 38 Degrees have set up a public meeting in Cambridge, which MP Julian Huppert will be attending. Here’s what 38 Degrees  have to say:

Want to help stop the gagging law? There’s a public meeting happening in Cambridge on 17th October. Your MP, Julian Huppert, has already confirmed that he’s attending. But we need to pack the meeting with lots of his constituents. Can you come?

Here are the details:
Friday 17th October
Wolfson Hall, Churchill College, Storey’s Way, Cambridge, CB3 0DS
7:30pm – 9:30pm

Your MP, Julian Huppert, is one of the MPs that we need to vote against the gagging law, if we’re going to stop it. 38 Degrees members voted to focus on public meetings as a way of persuading MPs to make a stand against the gagging law. We know it’s a very effective tactic. But we need to make sure the meeting is packed full to the rafters. To work, it needs to be big.

MPs will vote on the gagging law again on October 8th. Let’s make sure that for Julian Huppert MP, the thought of justifying the way he voted face-to-face with hundreds of constituents will be front of mind when he casts his votes. If we can get lots of people to turn out, it’s bound to impact on what your MP does as the law continues its way through parliament.

Everyone is welcome to come along, so please bring your friends and family. Even if you don’t want to ask a question, it will be interesting to hear what your MP, Julian Huppert, and the speakers have to say on the gagging law.

Visit our facebook event page and let us know if you can come. We need to show that as many people are planning to attend as possible, so please RSVP – and invite your friends too.

If you don’t have facebook, you can email emailtheteam@38degrees.org.uk or leave a comment on our blog to RSVP.

9. Global Sustainability Institute Seminar: A Fevered Planet

7 October, 1.00-2.00pm Lab 005 (Anglia Ruskin East Road campus) 

Speaker: Prof Hugh Montgomery, UCL

The number of humans on the planet has grown at an extraordinary rate, and in a very short space of time. At the same time, the rate of technical and industrial growth has massively accelerated- as have the demands and expectations of each individual. The net result is that humanity has degraded Earth’s biosphere at a rate which is unsustainable. On top of this, anthropogenic climate change acts as a force multiplier. For all too long, these combined impacts have been framed as ‘academic’, or at best distant and slow. They have also been framed in terms of tigers, polar bears, and tree frogs. But what does the environmental impact which humans have had on the environment mean for the environment’s impact on humans?

Any questions, or to let us know you’re coming (which is not essential) contact rosie.robison@anglia.ac.uk or julie-anne.hogbin@anglia.ac.uk, 01223 695107.

**Sustainable Lunch Provided**

10. Introduction to Permaculture with Claire White

12 – 13 October, 9.30am-5.00pm, Trumpington Pavillion 09:30-17:30

Permaculture is the underpinning philosophy behind Transition Towns. While Permaculture has it’s origins in land use and growing systems that is only a part of Permaculture. It is a design system, not just for gardening but for all aspects of living sustainably, be that in our emotional lives, how we design and use our homes and much much more. This weekend course Costs £75 (£65 unwaged).

11. Global Sustainability Institute: Festival of Ideas event

23 October, 5.30-7.00pm, LAB 027 (Anglia Ruskin East Road campus)

Title: Uncomfortable conversations… why discussing the big issues is so hard

Like politics, religion and money, climate change can be one of those topics it’s not very comfortable to talk about with friends. It can provoke strong feelings, and judgement of people’s life choices, so isn’t it more considerate not to mention it at all? In this interactive talk, speakers from the Global Sustainability Institute and friends will give their thoughts on why we avoid issues that it might be helpful for us to face up to, from climate change to our own health, and ask the audience to share their views and experiences. Led by Dr Rosie Robison and Julie-Anne Hogbin from the Global Sustainability Institute, Anglia Ruskin University.

15+, Free, Full access, Talk, Arrive on time, Booking not required

For more information see the Festival of Ideas event listing.

12. Green Enterprise: Carlos Ludlow-Palafox on opportunities in recycling

October 28, 7:30-9:30pm, Friends Meeting House, 12 Jesus Lane, Cambridge, CB5 8BA

Carlos Ludlow-Palafox of Enval is successful entrepreneur who has developed a patented process and built a commercial scale recycling plant for recycling the formerly unrecyclable flexible laminate packaging (as used for toothpaste tubes, food pouches and coffee) Carlos is clearly skilled at navigating the funding maze, so this session will be of interest to anyone wondering about how to find funding for their idea, or the important topic of how we can convert landfill waste into valuable resources.

As usual in Green-enterprise events, the evening will be participative and will include plenty of time for discussion with the speaker and other participants. Cost £5.

Posted in Newsletters | Comments Off on October newsletter: A tasty sustainable feast!

Gardening in August: Summer wanes as autumn fruits appear

by Keith Jordan

thermometerThe schools are out for summer and the holidays are in full flow but, with some regret, every year there are some subtle changes in the natural world in early/mid August that signal the summer is on the wane! The start of the football season is another reminder! Campers also find that clear nights and heavy dews can be a feature of mid August. My garden thermometer dropped to 6 deg C the other night here and it went down to about 4 C in Thetford.

About one week after the Cambridge Folk Festival finishes the swifts that have been flying and screeching over our houses are noticeably absent. They are already on the move, following their epic twice-yearly journey to Africa along with some of the warblers and other migrant birds that have graced our neighbourhoods. Continue reading

Posted in News, Sustainable food | Leave a comment